Activities of the intruder within other homeowner’s property are firm foundations of consequential defense. Before launching attack on the intruder the homeowner must put into consideration eventual impact of such uninvited individual.

We are living in times of rising awareness in individual rights. At the same time, a number of legislations have been continually reviewed to conform to this awakening. Laws governing ownership and administration of properties are among these legislations. There is no doubt that a person’s presence in any property should be approved by the owner. Entering into another person’s property without prior consent is illegal. It leads to trespass which is actionable in law courts.

Owning a property is accompanied with a number of privileges including vetting who may be in your premise at any given time. However, exceptional cases exist whereby government officials may raid a property as part of execution of their duties. In such circumstances, the homeowner is not entitled to chasing the unexpected guests away (Jacobus 300).

A person entering into another’s property without seeking owner’s consent is a law breaker. In addition to legal aspects of this intrusion it is implicit that uninvited guests can be nuisance, threat or inconveniencing. Owner of a property can use force to protect his/her privacy. However, the amount of force used must be proportional enough to the treat caused by the intruder. Actually if killing an intruder is the best way out, then the homeowner has all the rights of doing so. Reasoning behind killing an intruder is the fact that legal tools are not always readily available. Homeowner can kill to prevent or reduce further damage.

Elimination of life is immoral and unethical. Every individual has a right to live despite their undoing. Killing an intruder is only justified if it was not pre-meditated. Otherwise, arguing from a legal perspective it is wrong. Circumstances leading to death of an intruder must surround effort to defend one’s self or property. Investigations must reveal that intruder’s presence was posing a danger to the homeowner and his/her household.

Owning a property is accompanied with a number of privileges including vetting who may be in your premise at any given time. However, exceptional cases exist whereby government officials may raid a property as part of execution of their duties. In such circumstances, the homeowner is not entitled to chasing the unexpected guests away.

Work cited

Jacobus, Charles, Real Estate Principles, New York: Cengage Learning, 2009